Chest congestion: its causes, treatment of inflammation of the breast of the nursing

Breast

Depends the breast of the members of the specialized, as it is located on the front of the rib cage is considered the breast of the female is more developed than the breast of the male, so it can achieve its basic function, namely the production of milk for breastfeeding. Pour the mammary glands (Mammary gland) in the breast through many ducts in the nipple, which is surrounded by a layer of circular dark area around the nipple called the areola (areola). Called inflammation of the breast or chest congestion to inflammation of the internal tissues of the breast.

Chest congestion (inflammation of the breast)

Is the inflammation of the internal tissues of the breast as a result of the presence of infection, and mostly nursing mothers, it is possible to infect non-lactating women or men also. Results from the inflammation of the breast swelling and redness in the breast of the mother.

The causes of inflammation of the breast

Happen chest congestion as a result of entrapment of the milk in mother’s breasts due to clogged milk duct, lack of full understanding of the breast during breastfeeding, which provides the appropriate environment for the growth of bacteria that may enter the breast tissue as a result of bedsores and cracks in the nipples.

Symptoms and signs of inflammation of the breast

  • The hottest tits while you touch it.
  • Swelling and redness in the breast.
  • The presence of lumps in the breast.
  • Sense of pain during feeding.
  • Feeling sick in general.
  • A rise in temperature above the normal range for the body.

Factors that increase the infection of the breast

  • Exposure for earlier in the breast.
  • Cracks and erosions in the nipple.
  • Wear a tight bra or pressure on the breast leading to the entrapment of the milk flow.
  • The lack of attention to personal hygiene.
  • Unhealthy nutrition.
  • Smoking.

Complications of breast

May result from chest congestion be a collection of pus (abscess) are cured by surgically excised.

It is necessary when signs and symptoms of inflammation of the breast check with your doctor to avoid complications.

Diagnosis of breast

  • Physical examination the question about the signs and symptoms.
  • Farm milk the breasts to find out the right antibiotic.
  • Imaging test of the breast with radiation or ultrasound imaging, Oklahoma.

If you continue to have symptoms and signs after completion of the antibiotic will be taking a sample of breast tissue, to make sure that you are not afflicted with breast cancer.

Treatment of breast infection

  • Antibiotics: when infection, antibiotics are usually prescribed for 10 days.
  • Pain relievers: to minimize the pain resulting from the inflammation of the breast.
  • Necessary to continue to breastfeed if you are infected with the breast, because breastfeeding will help get rid of the infection, in turn, to wean a child leads to increased signs and symptoms.

Tips to prevent chest congestion

  • Dump the milk fully from the breast during breastfeeding.
  • Emptying one breast fully before moving to the other breast during breastfeeding.
  • Make sure you saturate your baby breast and position health and correct during lactation.
  • Quit smoking.
  • Proper nutrition.
  • Attention to personal care.

Sources

  • Joseph Pritchard (June 17, 2016) Mastitis, Available at: https://www.healthline.com/health/mastitis (Accessed: 6th November 2019).
  • Christine Case-Lo (August 28, 2017) What Is a Breast Infection?, Available at: https://www.healthline.com/health/breast-infection (Accessed: 6th November 2019).
  • Andrew C Miller, MD (Mar 12, 2019) Mastitis Empiric Therapy , Available at: https://emedicine.medscape.com/article/2028354-overview (Accessed: 6th November 2019).
  • J Michael Dixon, MD (2019) Lactational mastitis, Available at: https://www.uptodate.com/contents/lactational-mastitis (Accessed: 6th November 2019).
  • J Michael Dixon, MD, Kenneth M Pariser, MD (2019) Nonlactational mastitis in adults, Available at: https://www.uptodate.com/contents/nonlactational-mastitis-in-adults (Accessed: 6th November 2019).

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